Over the years, my students have asked many, many good questions. Here are some answers/ resources for those questions, grouped into categories.

—– in process—– check back soon for better updates!

POETRY & POETICS: GENERAL EDUCATION & POEM ACCESS

Q: If poetry thrills me and I want more, what are some good learning resources?

A: The following will provide hours (years?) of knowledge:

Q: What if I want to read/hear poets talk specifically about their CRAFT?

A: THE ABOVE resources, as well as the following:

  • How a Poem Happens features contemporary poets discussing the craft of poetry, focusing specifically on one of their own poems.
  • First Book Interviews is exactly what it sounds like: poets discussing their first books. . . This blog by Keith Montesanto continued a project originally begun by Kate Greenstreet, called “Every Other Day.”
  • Willow Springs Magazine has a great archive of interviews with poets, fiction writers, and essayists.

Q: I’m working on putting together a MANUSCRIPT. How do I go about this?

A: There is not single right way, but if it’s in poetry, I recommend checking out the gorgeously organized first books by Eduardo Corral (SLOW LIGHTNING), Kim Addonizio (THE PHILOSOPHER’S CLUB), and/or the book you admire most, or ones that most closely resemble the genre in which you are working. Map how it is laid out and consider if your work would fit into a similar arrangement/pattern, or not? There are also these resources:

Q: I love listening to poets read. Where/how can I do that?

A: Here are some great resources for POETRY AUDIO:

  • I love visiting Linebreak.org to hear poets reading other poets’ poems.
  • From the Fishouse, an audio archive of emerging poets, houses recordings of poets reading their own work.
  • Poetry Out Loud, the National Recitation Project, has a website that houses tons of resources, including audio recordings, tips for recitation, & etc.
  • This is related to Poetry 180, which is a resource, curated by former U.S. PL Billy Collins, for educators.
  • New Ohio Review has an audio feature you might check out.
  • The Favorite Poem project hosts contemporary poets saying poems they love.
  • Button Poetry host an array of poets reading their work–plus video!

Q: I’m interested in learning more about TRANSLATION. What do you recommend?

A: The following host resources related to translation:

Asymptote Journal focuses on translation. 

(Check out this really great podcast with one of their contributors, Jorge Vessel, on “That Which is Found and Gained Through Translation.”)

Necessary Fiction keeps a “Translation Notes” section!

(more to come!)

GENRE BLUR/ NONFICTION, ADDING SCIENCE TO YOUR WORK

Q: What about resources for Creative Nonfiction or even just weird research for hybrid work?

A: All of the following . . .

WRITING PROMPTS

Q: I LOVE writing but can never get started. Where can I get FREE WRITING PROMPTS?

A:

PUBLISHING RESOURCES & OTHER MISC. STUFF

Q: I want to send my work out for publication. Where do I begin?

A FEW TIPS ON READYING YOUR WORK FOR SUBMISSION

Most magazines will have specific guidelines, but often, you’ll want to prepare a submission packet of 3-5 poems. It often helps if these poems “talk to” each other–that is, if they have some thread that connects them. However, it’s also totally fine if your poems are unrelated. You’ll want to write a short, third-person bio (unless the publication requests something else). You can see an example of such a bio by reading the contributor notes in a recent issue of the journal to which you’re submitting. Your cover letter should be brief; address the editors by name if possible, and if you have read their journal before, you might say something like “I admire [journal name] and particularly enjoyed work by [author name] in the latest issue.” Proof your submission for typos & errors; you improve your ethos with a clean submission. Also: hope for acceptance, but don’t get down if your work is rejected! Rejection just tells you to keep working and improving, keep reading poets you admire, keep noticing things in the world and making it new on the page.

WANT TO STUDY with other STUDENTS? HERE ARE A FEW ROUTES TO INFORMATION ABOUT FORMAL & SEMI-FORMAL ROUTES:

AWP’s Guide to Writing Programs: https://www.awpwriter.org/programs_conferences/guide_writing_programs

MFA Programs via PW list: http://www.pw.org/mfa

Conferences & residency programs: http://www.pw.org/conferences_and_residencies