Learning About Poetry & Poetics

Here are some of my personal favorite sites for students of poetry (students= anyone hungry for more). This page is a work in progress.

POETRY: GENERAL EDUCATION & POEM ACCESS

Poetry Foundation houses thousands of poems, contemporary and classic, as well as podcasts & videos about poetry.

Poets.org is the website of the Academy of American Poets, which gives awards & honors to poets and houses thousands of poems online.

-They also have educational resources, such as those on Poetic Forms: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/collection/poetic-forms

-& a Poetry Glossary: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/text/poetry-glossary

Washington State has a Poet Laureate Program, sponsored by Humanities Washington & ArtsWA. Check it out. Claudia Castro Luna is Washington’s current PL.

Poetry Daily hosts a new poem every day.

Redactions Poetry hosts great resources.

POETRY CRAFT TALK

How a Poem Happens features contemporary poets discussing the craft of poetry, focusing specifically on one of their own poems.

First Book Interviews is exactly what it sounds like: poets discussing their first books. . . This blog by Keith Montesanto continued a project originally begun by Kate Greenstreet, called “Every Other Day.”

Former Tupelo Press Editor Jeffrey Levine wrote a column a few years ago called “On Making the Poetry Manuscript.” It’s super helpful.

Then there’s also this thoughtful post about it by poet Susan Rich.

Willow Springs Magazine has a great archive of interviews with poets, fiction writers, and essayists.

POETRY AUDIO

I love visiting Linebreak.org to hear poets reading other poets’ poems.

From the Fishouse, an audio archive of emerging poets, houses recordings of poets reading their own work.

Poetry Out Loud, the National Recitation Project, has a website that houses tons of resources, including audio recordings, tips for recitation, & etc.

This is related to Poetry 180, which is a resource, curated by former U.S. PL Billy Collins, for educators.

New Ohio Review has an audio feature you might check out.

The Favorite Poem project hosts contemporary poets saying poems they love.

GENRE BLUR/ NONFICTION, ADDING SCIENCE TO YOUR WORK

Brevity: a Journal of Concise Literary Nonfiction has been publishing high quality creative nonfiction pieces 750 words or less for nearly two decades.

Fourth Genre is a magazine of contemporary creative nonfiction worth checking out.

Check out the magazine CREATIVE NONFICTION, edited by Lee Gutkind.

One of the coolest things on the internet (IMHO) is Public Domain Review.

Scientific American is as good a place as any to start if you want to write sciencey poems & prose shorts.

Ubuweb is an eclectic resource in underground avant-garde information & art resources.

The Internet Archive hosts a realm of resources for free on the web.

FREE WRITING PROMPTS

I post regular prompts to my website.

Poets & Writers Magazine hosts “The Time is Now,” free prompts in the genres of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

PUBLISHING RESOURCES & OTHER MISC. STUFF

Newpages–a resource for navigating publishing opportunities

Poets & Writers–the online companion to the magazine

The Association of Writers & Writing Programs, AWP, is the largest organization of its kind.

Trish Hopkinson keeps a blog of poetry resources & calls for submissions. She often focuses on journals that don’t charge a submission fee.

A FEW TIPS ON READYING YOUR WORK FOR SUBMISSION

Most magazines will have specific guidelines, but often, you’ll want to prepare a submission packet of 3-5 poems. It often helps if these poems “talk to” each other–that is, if they have some thread that connects them. However, it’s also totally fine if your poems are unrelated. You’ll want to write a short, third-person bio (unless the publication requests something else). You can see an example of such a bio by reading the contributor notes in a recent issue of the journal to which you’re submitting. Your cover letter should be brief; address the editors by name if possible, and if you have read their journal before, you might say something like “I admire [journal name] and particularly enjoyed work by [author name] in the latest issue.” Proof your submission for typos & errors; you improve your ethos with a clean submission. Also: hope for acceptance, but don’t get down if your work is rejected! Rejection just tells you to keep working and improving, keep reading poets you admire, keep noticing things in the world and making it new on the page.

 

WANT TO STUDY with other STUDENTS? HERE ARE A FEW ROUTES TO INFORMATION ABOUT FORMAL & SEMI-FORMAL ROUTES:

AWP’s Guide to Writing Programs: https://www.awpwriter.org/programs_conferences/guide_writing_programs

MFA Programs via PW list: http://www.pw.org/mfa

Conferences & residency programs: http://www.pw.org/conferences_and_residencies

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